Marji Laine: Faith~Driven Fiction

. . . Authentic and Intense

Nice is as Nice Does

11 Comments

Wow, a lot of you have opinions about being nice! Thanks so much for all of your comments. There were several with roughly the same message. Nice is accepted as long as it's sincere. I would tend to agree that I prefer sincere nice people around me in my world. While my friends are quirky and fun, they are very generous, kind, gracious gals who put me to shame in the nice department!

But I want to throw a monkey into the works.

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Author: Marji Laine

Marji is a homeschooling mom with teenage twins left in the nest. She spends her days transporting to and from volleyball, teaching writing classes at a local coop, and directing the children’s music program at her church. Raised in suburban Dallas, she got her first taste of writing through the stories of brilliant authors of their day, Mignon Eberhart and Phyllis A. Whitney, and through stage experience. After directing and acting in productions for decades, Marji started writing her own scripts. From that early beginning, she delved into creating scintillating suspense with a side of Texas sassy. She invites readers to unravel their inspiration, seeking a deeper knowledge of the Lord’s Great Mystery that invites us all.

11 thoughts on “Nice is as Nice Does

  1. Patty,That's what the precious redhead and I decided while we drove back from – you guessed it – volleyball practice! Because those main characters have to go through change and because the hero, more often than not, has to be broken to realize his love for the heroine or else he would've been snatched up long ago, they won't often start out nice. (Except in Susan May Warren's MY FOOLISH HEART where their challenges lay elsewhere.)Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Hmm, great question. Maybe because characters need to grow, we have to let them be deficient somewhere. And if they're going through a lot, well, I think most of us can say that when times are tough our niceness can suffer.

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  3. Good point! I didn't think about the Colonel in that book. He was certainly nice and long-suffering while Marianne went flitting around with bad-boy Willoughby. He's another nice guy hero-type! That's two!

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  4. Nice and boring don't have to go together, although it may seem that way at times. Often, we may want to pass by someone who is "nice", citing it as a detriment to them as compared to the "bad boy", until we have experiences that give us a true basis for comparison (as in Sense & Sensibility).

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  5. My daughter reminded me that Superman is nice. I told her he doesn't count! She did come up with a real hero that was nice in every respect. Edward Farris from Sense and Sensibility. The only problem is, I didn't like the character. I thought he was pretty spineless throughout. Oh, but then we talked about the hero and heroine in Susan May Warren's book DEADLY PURSUIT. Neither of them were nice, more like the Taming of the Shrew type again. But her newest book, MY FOOLISH HEART, scores! Both of those main characters where extremely kind, but not pushovers. They had an internal strength and a peace that made it work! Yea!

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  6. Loree, Sometimes a light read is just what I need – especially a short story.Brandi, I get what you're saying. The diamond in the rough. Still can't remember any nice heroes, though.

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  7. Nice is nice…and makes a nice read sometimes.

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  8. I like to read about characters who are really kind at heart, but it gradually comes out as the story progresses. It also helps when the hero and heroine can be nice and savvy at the same time. Naive characters can be tiresome.

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  9. Jane Eyre is a great example, Anne!I agree, Julie, meek doesn't make for a good lead, but I remember one that would fit the category. Elizabeth from THE PREACHER'S BRIDE. She was incredibly kind, but not one to back down in the face of pressure.I just can't think of any nice heroes though.

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  10. I think a hero or heroine can be nice – as long as they're also brave. Meek and fearful doesn't make a great lead character. Nice and fearless would be a fun combo!

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  11. I think one of the best examples of a kind and good heroine is Jane Eyre. She is strong and compassionate and kind with very few obvious flaws and yet she is much-loved and has endured the test of time. Another is Esther Summerson from Dickens' Bleak House. It can be done. It just must be done well.

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