Marji Laine: Faith~Driven Fiction

. . . Authentic and Intense

Fragmented

13 Comments

It has come to my attention, that fragments, such as they are, can be perfectly acceptable. In professional writing. I've seen many examples of it. One word sentences. Other short expressions that, while they don't have clear subjects or predicates, stand alone as a complete thought.

How many fragments could you count in the first paragraph? I'm no expert, but
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Author: Marji Laine

Marji is a homeschooling mom with teenage twins left in the nest. She spends her days transporting to and from volleyball, teaching writing classes at a local coop, and directing the children’s music program at her church. Raised in suburban Dallas, she got her first taste of writing through the stories of brilliant authors of their day, Mignon Eberhart and Phyllis A. Whitney, and through stage experience. After directing and acting in productions for decades, Marji started writing her own scripts. From that early beginning, she delved into creating scintillating suspense with a side of Texas sassy. She invites readers to unravel their inspiration, seeking a deeper knowledge of the Lord’s Great Mystery that invites us all.

13 thoughts on “Fragmented

  1. Yes, professionals can get away with them in fiction. But students won't get away with them in expository writing!

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  2. I've noticed how fragments are used in some stories! Definitely have to remember this for my essays. :)Meg

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  3. Yea for you, Erin! Keep up the good work!

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  4. Well, considering the fact that I am still a writing student, my sentances must be complete.

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  5. Thanks for stopping by, C.Kay. I'm watching for this technique as I read and as I write now days!

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  6. I've never thought about fragments in just that way before. When I'm reading a novel, it just makes sense to see them in certain places to make the thoughts flow. This factor makes the story much more enjoyable for the reader. Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this.

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  7. Thanks for visiting, Rebekah. That's exactly the type of character who might use them. Good eye!

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  8. I love fragments in novels. I noticed them first written in the words and thoughts of a tough no-nonsense, fifteen year-old bird-kid, heroine. Similar to your modern, tough, detective, I suppose the authors used the fragments to describe their personalities in a let-the-audience-figure-it-out-kind-of-way.Enjoyed "Fragmented" thoroughly,Rebekah

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  9. I notice it more and more now that I'm aware of it, Loree. And it can make a big difference in the mood of a character or the tone of an event.

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  10. This is an interesting post. You gave me tons to chew on here.I agree that much of it has to do with voice.

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  11. Are you hinting at something…-Amy Jo

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  12. I suppose we have absolutely no excuses then! Write complete sentences I will.

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