Marji Laine: Faith~Driven Fiction

. . . Authentic and Intense

Writing Tip – Pre-Writing

15 Comments

I've been reading a lot about outlining this week. First, in an email course I got, and then from a question I had from a student.

I've said it before, I'm not a "pantser", a seat-of-the-pants writer who is so stinking creative that everything just flows out in perfect order. I know some of them, am in awe of their abilities (and their memories), but I could never hope to be one.

Because I have a lousy memory and because the
Read more »

Advertisements

Author: Marji Laine

Marji is a homeschooling mom with teenage twins left in the nest. She spends her days transporting to and from volleyball, teaching writing classes at a local coop, and directing the children’s music program at her church. Raised in suburban Dallas, she got her first taste of writing through the stories of brilliant authors of their day, Mignon Eberhart and Phyllis A. Whitney, and through stage experience. After directing and acting in productions for decades, Marji started writing her own scripts. From that early beginning, she delved into creating scintillating suspense with a side of Texas sassy. She invites readers to unravel their inspiration, seeking a deeper knowledge of the Lord’s Great Mystery that invites us all.

15 thoughts on “Writing Tip – Pre-Writing

  1. who knew it was so complicated to write!JuStIn

    Like

  2. Wow! I had no idea you have to put so much work into writing a book. I don't know if I could do it!Sharlena Powell

    Like

  3. You make the complicated process of putting together the pieces of the novel's puzzle sound so easy. I myself probably lean more towards being a plotter. My favorite part of the whole process is the brainstorming for plots and characters. – C. Kay Elsie

    Like

  4. For a speech or an essay, making an outline really helps me.

    Like

  5. Glad you found me, too, Cheryl! As an elem teacher, I loved middle-grade mysteries! (Faves are the Westing Game and Who Stole the Wizard of Oz.)

    Like

  6. Wow! Diagrams and everything! You're one organized gal!! I think that's why the Lord has me writing non-fiction – I'm not sure I'd be motivated enough to painstakingly plot everything out. Kudos to you, Marji! Have a beautiful week!

    Like

  7. Oh my, Marji! You are quite the planner! I'm a "panster" so I kind of go along for the ride!And–I write mysteries, too, but mine are for middle grades.Glad I found you!

    Like

  8. Oh Kathryn, I can tell you an artist. My rational mind begs for compartments so I can maintain focus on the story. I'm amazed at folks that can let their fingers sing. Mine can only work through jingles before I forget where they were headed. But I love the visual of the story as a song. Once done, it certainly should dance with the emotion. The boxes I use as tools, like paint brushes to an artist, shouldn't show to the reader at all.

    Like

  9. Why not try shifting it all to a metrical deep play, the poet's device, letting the voice come as it will. Story began as a poem, as a lay, an epic, a saga, and a song. Maybe we try too hard to make writing be rational.

    Like

  10. Oh but you're going to LOVE outlining come next semester because it's gonna save your bacon! Whoop!

    Like

  11. I can't stand planning and pre-writing. Often I'll write a paper and my mother will ask me where my outline is. I usually end up writing an outline and completely rewriting my paper right before the deadline, even though I had it completed over the weekend.

    Like

  12. Thanks so much, Jessica, for the tip. I'll look up that article! I'm probably way over the top, but my board allowed me to grab my next three scenes so I could use my time while I wait for the end of volleyball practice.

    Like

  13. I'm a pantser, but I do love making character sketches. It's a really visual and creative process. Love the sketches you did for your hero. They're so organized!

    Like

  14. I'm both…mostly a panster. I do plot but in a notebook.

    Like

  15. You don't seem like a pantser to me! lol I do what you do with the notebook, but I actually use OneNote by microsoft. You can create tons of notebooks and the research you copy and paste holds the links where you got it from, plus you can drag and drop and create notecards. Very cool.But, when it comes to murder, I still use a wall size dry erase board aka murder board. Why fix it if it ain't broke!Jill Kemerer did a great post some time back on One Note. You might like it! 🙂

    Like