Marji Laine: Faith~Driven Fiction

. . . Authentic and Intense

Character Moment: Turn-Around Man

old manI’ve heard he was in the Vietnam War and that fact by itself could explain his odd habits. He can be seen walking across parks, lots, even crossing the street in the same manner. Five paces and a three step turn. Once isn’t such a huge deal, but he’ll do it all the way down the block. He makes me dizzy watching him, I can’t understand how he stays in a straight line. I’d hate to see him walking a dog that way.

And at first, his dance almost seems comical and then a little tragic, until I consider that this type of behavior might have been cultivated in a battle zone. Being aware of everyone around him at all times likely kept him alive.

 
He speaks very little. In fact, I’ve never heard him say anything. But he has a broad tooth grin that he uses quite often.
 
“How ya doin’ today?” I’ll ask.
 
He’ll smile and nod while he glances first over my shoulder and then over his own. Clearly, I’m no threat, but he doesn’t let his guard down. He nods again as a goodbye then saunters along the crosswalk, five paces and a three step turn.
 
The pirouette has drawn the nickname “turn-around man,” and few people even  know his real name. I assume that his proper name is known, at least by his employer. This company was brilliant in hiring him. Someone who focuses on every thing around him with the detail of a detective. And yet he smiles with a broad, sincere welcome.
 
The Walmart greeter that they had before him never smiled and hardly even glanced at the folks when they came in. But Turnaround Man keeps his eyes roving from the entrance to the folks leaving at all times and is never without his grin and nod.
 
But I still don’t know his name. And his name tag is no help. Oh, he has one all right. It says, “T.A.M.”
 
Your Turn: Keep your eyes open today. Do you see any interesting quirks.
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Author: Marji Laine

Marji is a homeschooling mom with teenage twins left in the nest. She spends her days transporting to and from volleyball, teaching writing classes at a local coop, and directing the children’s music program at her church. Raised in suburban Dallas, she got her first taste of writing through the stories of brilliant authors of their day, Mignon Eberhart and Phyllis A. Whitney, and through stage experience. After directing and acting in productions for decades, Marji started writing her own scripts. From that early beginning, she delved into creating scintillating suspense with a side of Texas sassy. She invites readers to unravel their inspiration, seeking a deeper knowledge of the Lord’s Great Mystery that invites us all.

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